Can the distributional impacts of macroeconomic shocks be predicted?

a comparison of the performance of macro-micro models with historical data for Brazil
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World Bank , [Washington, D.C
Financial crises -- Brazil -- Econometric models., Income distribution -- Brazil -- Econometric models., Brazil -- Economic conditions -- 1985- -- Econometric mo

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StatementLuiz A. Pereira da Silva ... [et al.].
SeriesPolicy research working paper ;, 3303, Policy research working papers (Online) ;, 3303.
ContributionsSilva, Luiz A. Pereira da., World Bank.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHG3881.5.W57
The Physical Object
FormatElectronic resource
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3389478M
LC Control Number2004615755

Shocks on poverty and inequality. 3 Such detailed analysis of the actual, ex-post distributional impacts of specific macroeconomic events is extremely valuable and, in some sense, is the inevitable first step.

But it does not provide much guidance to policymakers facing the likelihood of similar shocks in other. Can the distributional impacts of macroeconomic shocks be predicted.

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Washington, D.C.: World Bank, Development Research Group, Poverty Team and Development Economics, Office of the Senior Vice President and Chief Economist, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, International government publication, Internet resource. "Can the distributional impacts of macroeconomic shocks be predicted.

A comparison of the performance of macro-micro models with historical data for Brazil," Policy Research Working Paper SeriesThe World Bank. shocks on poverty and inequality. 3 Such detailed analysis of the actual, ex-post distributional impacts of specific macroeconomic events is extremely valuable and, in some sense, is the.

Can the Distributional Impacts of Macroeconomic Shocks be Predicted. A Comparison of the Performance of Macro-Micro Models with Historical Data for Brazil. Get this from a library. Can the distributional impacts of macroeconomic shocks be predicted?: a comparison of the performance of macro-micro models with historical data for Brazil.

[Francisco H G Ferreira; World Bank. Development Research Group. Poverty Team.; World Bank. Office of the Senior Vice President and Chief Economist, Development Economics.;]. Downloadable. The importance of distributional issues in policymaking creates a need for empirical tools to assess the social impact of economic shocks and policies.

This paper reviews some of the modeling approaches that are currently in use at the World Bank and other international financial institutions. The specification of these models is dictated by the issues at. Furthermore, shocks and policies have macroeconomic, structural, and distributional implications.

This creates interdependence between such policy issues. Finally, the distributional impact of shocks and policies hinges on the heterogeneity of socioeconomic agents with respect to endowments and behavior.

Under macroeconomic stability (no shocks and macro conditions) social expenditure policy for poverty reduction would have had an important.

This book reviews techniques and tools that can be used to evaluate the poverty and distributional impact of economic policy choices. It describes the most robust techniques and tools now available-from the simplest to the most complex-and identifies best practices.

This limits households' ability to insure against household-specific (or sector-specific) shocks and magnifies the distributional effects of aggregate macroeconomic fluctuations and associated policy responses. These effects are likely to be even larger in emerging market and low-income economies beset by financial frictions.

Purchase Macroeconomic Impacts of Energy Shocks, Volume - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBNBook Edition: 1.

persistence of the impacts on economic growth. The cointegrating vector autoregression system that contains appropriate variables is used to analyse these shocks. • External shocks have a minimal effect on the long-run course of economic growth.

• External shocks have a very profound effect on domestic monetary and fiscal policies. Examining types of macroeconomic shocks. words (6 pages) Essay in Economics. 5/12/16 Economics Reference this Disclaimer: This work has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work produced by our Essay Writing Service.

You can view samples of our professional work here. Macroeconomic Shocks and Policies B. Essama-Nssah 7 T he importance of distributional issues in policymaking creates a need for empirical toolsthat can help assess the impact of economic shocks and policies on the living standards of relevant individuals.

The Macroeconomic Impact of Microeconomic Shocks: Beyond Hulten’s Theorem David Rezza Baqaee UCLA Emmanuel Farhi Harvard July 5, Abstract We provide a nonlinear characterization of the macroeconomic impact of microe-conomic productivity shocks in terms of reduced-form non-parametric elasticities for e cient Size: KB.

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Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. Economic Shock: An economic shock is an event that occurs outside of an economy, and produces a significant change within an economy.

Macroeconomics Impacts of Energy Shocks. Edited by Bert G. HICKMAN, Hillard G. HUNTINGTON, select article Macroeconomic Impacts of Energy Shocks: A Summary of the Key Results. Book chapter Full text access Macroeconomic Impacts of Energy Shocks and Policy Responses. Chapter 1—Macroeconomic Shocks 3 C.

External Shocks and Transmission Channels1 Global Income Sincethe growth of the major developed economy countries, and world export demand, has weakened as the global credit crisis, which began in File Size: KB. Chen, W., Hamori, S &Kinkyo, T. Macroeconomic impacts of oil prices and underlying financial l of International Financial Markets, Institutions & Money, 29, Chuku, C.

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Linear and asymmetric impacts of oil price shocks in an oil-importing and -exporting economy: the case of Nigeria. Macroeconomic Shocks and Their Propagation V.A. Ramey University of California, San Diego, CA, United States NBER, Cambridge, MA, United States Contents 1.

Introduction 72 2. Methods for Identifying Shocks and Estimating Impulse Responses 74 Overview: What Is a Shock. 74 Illustrative Framework 75 Common Identification Methods We extend Kilian's () framework to identify an exogenous shock arising from changes in financial market conditions and examine the consequent macroeconomic impacts of oil price changes.

We find that a financial shock is a key determinant of oil prices and its macroeconomic impact is as important as the impact of other underlying by: Average output losses due to short-run sectoral shocks are an order of magnitude larger than the welfare cost of business cycles calculated by Lucas ().

Nonlinearities can also cause shocks to critical sectors to have disproportionate macroeconomic effects, almost tripling the estimated impact of the s oil shocks on world aggregate by: the leading candidates for macroeconomic shocks and their importance in explaining economic fluctuations since Cochrane’s speculation.

The chapter progresses as follows. Section 2 begins by defining what a macroeconomic shock is. It then summarizes the many tools used for identifying macroeconomic shocks and computing impulse responses.

Macroeconomic Effects of Financial Shocks by Urban Jermann and Vincenzo Quadrini. Published in volumeissue 1, pages of American Economic Review, FebruaryAbstract: We document the cyclical properties of US firms' financial flows and show that equity payout is procyclical and debt.

forecast the effects of macroeconomic shocks on banking sector credit risk and the likelihood of banking distress. Earlier studies have primarily employed single-equation regression models. However, these models suffer from two chief drawbacks.

First, it is difficult to distinguish correlation from causality. Second, they are unable to capture theFile Size: KB.

"Can the Distributional Impacts of Macroeconomic Shocks Be Predicted?: A Comparison of Top-Down Macro-Micro Models with Historical Data for Brazil." In The Impact of Macroeconomic Policies on Poverty and IncomeDistribution: Macro-Micro Evaluation Techniques and Tools, edited by François Bourguignon, Maurizio Bussolo, and Luiz A.

Pereira da Author: Oscar Barriga Cabanillas, Maria Ana Lugo, Hannah Nielsen, Carlos Rodríguez-Castelán, Maria Pia Zanet. Discouraged and marginally attached workers have received increasing attention from policy makers over the past several years. Through slackness in the labor market, periods of high unemployment should reduce the likelihood of receiving a job offer and thus create more discouraged workers.

However, the existing literature generally fails to find evidence of such Cited by: which can be interpreted as new equity issues.1 Second, we consider shocks that affect directly the financial sector of the economy. Therefore, the financial sector acts as a source of the business cycle, in addition to affecting the propagation of shocks that originate in other sectors of the economy.

In this respect the article is. Economics Distributional Macroeconomics Spring This is the second half of ECON “Computational Economics” at Harvard, co-taught with Jesus Fernández-Villaverde.

My part of the course will focus partly on substance File Size: 84KB.“Can the distributional impacts of macroeconomic shocks be predicted?

A comparison of the performance of macro-micro models with historical data for Brazil”, in Bourguignon and Pereira da Silva (eds.): Toolkit, Volume II.

Forthcoming. (with Phillippe Leite, Luiz Pereira da .Shocks are events that are by and large unexpected and bring out changes in real economic growth, inflation and unemployment. All countries are exposed to some degree to external economic shocks. There is evidence that lower and middle-income developing nations are more vulnerable partly because they have a less diversified economy with a narrow range of .